Build your brand or risk getting branded!


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Millions of us that work, very closely adhere our self-image to our work. It’s debatable whether that’s fortunate or not. We tend to closely associate our recognition by the position and company we keep. You are either a Software Developer or a Sales guy at Google, Apple or Yahoo or somewhere else.

Hence, when someone leaves a job, they are kind of lost until they find their image back at a new role. However, it doesn’t have to be that way.

I believe, everyone should craft their unique identity and brand based on who they really are, what they like and are passionate about, and how their uniqueness comes across as an advantage to a position or an organization they associate themselves with.

Let me enlighten you with an example that many will understand. There are several skilled and stellar actors in our movie world. Some are known for a single role or certain kind of roles they play. They are branded for that role and/or movie or for that stream of roles they play. Their work in specific movies and roles tends to brand them. While, there are others who have crafted their own unique image and play multiple roles in a variety of movies, yet hold their own. You watch a certain movie because that particular actor starred in it. Some movies, you go to watch for the movie and others, you watch because of the actor. That’s the difference.

Not everyone is fortunate to have that range of visibility for their work, yet with a bit of smarts, you can differentiate yourself from the multitude that work in a similar line as you, and put your own stamp on the work you perform. Not only does it distinguish you but also attracts better and unique opportunities your way that can propel you way beyond your wildest imagination.

Take on the challenges you are faced with by the horns and put your best foot forward, and always give that little bit extra of yourself to make your mark!

Sales, Marketing and Client Management – Influence of the Art and Science of it


Sales, Marketing and Client Management are key functions that, when done right, help with continued sustenance and healthy growth of an organization.

What makes someone a great sales person or passionate client management professional?

While having the aptitude to truly enjoy the responsibility of these functions is a given, the blend of having an upbeat attitude, charisma and innate traits that go with being convincing and having superior negotiation skills go a long way. Certain traits are a part of the personality and other skills can be attained or rather, fine-tuned through training.

Generally, future performance in sales and client management roles are judged based on past performance. Considered a predictable indicator, there is only so much reliability you can attribute to this.

Coming back to the art of sales, marketing and client management, prowess in these areas is based on aptitude, attitude, personality-based traits and learned skills.

When you consider using the art side of sales, marketing and client management, decisions are made and acted upon based on gut reactions, and end results rely much on personality traits and learned skills to help drive closure.

However, when we come to the science of it; that is where you see an impact of the industry and solution/ product knowledge, technical prowess, understanding of competitive landscape, market dynamics and more.

In today’s world, data plays such an important role in not just decision making, but facts based decision-making. Efforts are made to understand and simulate client needs, in many a case even before, the clients themselves know of their needs! That’s where the science of marketing comes into play to educate clients about their unforeseen needs and then, propose solutions to fulfill such needs.

The science of it all helps differentiate impactful marketing, trusty and inspired relationships with prospects and clients and helps further build on pure transparency of relationships as true partners engaging in solving the same problems, and not as two counter intuitive entities playing the roles of a buyer and seller, where the relationship is based on individual organizational interests and revenue plans than working together as partners to solve problems to the benefit of both.

In the latter scenario, there is true cross pollination of ideas and experimentation of new solutions as true partners.

In summary, an understanding of market dynamics, competitive landscape, true customer needs, product and solution specifics in relation to solving customer needs go a long way in closing deals and maintaining long term reference able clients as true partners that mutually thrive. This knowledge differentiates true sales, marketing and client management professionals as trusted partners from those that rely purely on the art of it. It also has a very profound impact on industry and organizational acceleration in their respective realms of pursuit and immensely influences their success.

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Who do you work for?


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When asked the question, some of the common answers are – myself, my family & my company. There are those that refuse to acknowledge they are working for anyone, be it a person or an organization and use the word “with”, I work “with” xyz. Semantics, I guess. And then, there are those that state they work for their boss.

We all work to provide for our dependents and ourselves. The question is not what do you work for, but who.

If you are an entrepreneur and pride yourself in working for yourself, there is some truth to that, but ultimately, the superior power that determines your actions lies with your customers, suppliers & investors. They can dictate the terms of your work. If you work for an organization, ideally your work and its attributes should be focused at fulfilling your organization’s obligations toward its customers and shareholders. Each of us that works in the corporate world falls somewhere on an organizational ladder with a “boss” that we report into. The boss has the power to determine your paycheck, your upward mobility within the organization and responsibilities you’ll handle. Some bosses are company focused which means your expectations fall in line as well. In such situations, there is more transparency built-in between levels i.e. employee reach extends beyond the immediate boss and through a couple of levels above. This is healthy as hierarchical stress is not as much and opportunities open up for those truly talented and doing the right thing. Others are self-serving and that’s when conflict may arise. That’s when one may end up working for a boss. Corporate politics can dictate where ones’ loyalties lie. Much depends on the employee-boss relationship & the personalities involved therein. Many employees are in the process of pleasing their bosses than in the actual performance of their job to meet the objectives they signed up for. And, these employees cannot be blamed altogether for it since they are acting in defense of their position and in many a case, they themselves are the only defense they may have.

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There have been arguments that state flat organizational structures may be the answer to curb such influences, where employees work in teams and natural leaders emerge as a part of the execution strategy. The emphasis is on actually getting things done to meet common objectives sans a hierarchy within the organization. Well, it may work to an extent in smaller organizations but flat structures are not scalable for growth. As organizations grow, flexibility & controls need to be established using the hierarchy model. And, in every mid to large organization, there are numerous rungs on the corporate ladders. Then, what is the optimal strategy for ensuring that the focus of every employee is truly on corporate goals and not hijacked by personal corporate politics? A strong HR policy propagated by a strong HR team with the support of top management can achieve this to an extent but in a complex business environment, it is difficult to altogether do away with it. Again, having an HR team that functions independently is a difficult thing to achieve in an organization. The HR team too falls on the corporate ladder. There will always be employees serving bosses for various reasons. Although, not completely healthy, this is a true fact in the corporate world and should be managed to optimize it.

When faced with such a predicament, employees who find it detrimental to their principles & career might look for other opportunities so as not to sacrifice their potential & aspirations catering to the whims of an overbearing, self-serving boss. There are also employees who do the boss’s bidding and focus on keeping the boss happy in order to safeguard their jobs. In both cases, it’s detrimental to the corporation, whether through the loss of productive employees for the wrong reasons or by having unproductive employees stay just managing their supervisors. But, at the same time, such bosses are a more serious predicament since their influence and its effect tends to be on a larger scale. It’s the prerogative of every organization to take this issue seriously and work through its channels to monitor and minimize such situations, if not totally eradicate them to ensure optimal productivity of the employee base. Much of it comes from encouraging true transparency throughout the organization irrespective of reporting relationships. And such transparency can be propagated through frequent top-down-top communication, more objective 360 degree performance appraisals, employee reviews as well as supervisor reviews, career pathing, ensuring employees with the right skills are not in wrong jobs etc.

That’s a starter list of ways to nurture healthy employee-work dynamics within organizations. I look forward to see you add to it.