Connected, yet drained!


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In the current digital era, the highly networked age, everyone you know or do not know has a connected device at hand. Mobile phones, tablets, laptops and personal computers are everywhere around us. You have them at home, at work and everywhere in between. You can reach anyone across the world at the speed of thought! You can call, leave a message, email, text, and chat or get on social networking sites and apps and share. Boy, are you connected! You have the reach at your fingertips that, a couple of decades ago was only dreamt of.

But, do you really connect? The human mind is so flirtatious that it cannot afford to stay put on one interaction for longer than a few seconds to perhaps, a couple of minutes. It has to keep moving, has to find new interests and fleet to the next as the previous one starts to wane away. That is what the rapid and overwhelming influx of information and our highly networked times has done to us. How many times have you glanced at your mobile phone today? Checked that Facebook app, that LinkedIn page, those Twitter tweets for the nth time yet?

There is no denying the fact that what technology has enabled is highly valuable. To reach someone on the other side of the planet in real time is immense. It has brought us all together in various aspects of life, personal and professional, and made the world smaller. It has made us one people and erased boundaries and other demarcations that once divided us. And, in every sense of what it set out to do, it has enabled us to make progress as better educated, aware, enlightened and open-minded humans that care about, not just what’s around us, but across the world.

And, this ability, in the larger scheme of things is highly efficient and valuable. However, what it has also done is, robbed us of what we once cherished and valued. True social interactions, in person meetings where we greeted each other and shared bonhomie, family and friends get-togethers where we cherished knowing each other and encouraged finer aspects of our personalities, social events where we met, talked, shared opinions and thoughts, all those are not as frequent or as rich as they once were. Perhaps, it is now that we reminisce the value of what we are continuing to lose. Think about it, you live in the same home, but communicate with your spouse and kids via devices. The family room conversations, the dinner table chitchat, the long ride interactions and coming together to participate in events that enriched us and strengthened our bonds are becoming rare; perhaps only on special occasions do these occur, if at all. Its in our best interest to save these and cultivate them, not just in ourselves but in future generations for they enriched us and defined our very existence, as people, as those who loved each other for what we were and strived to excel.

Technology has to be leveraged and used to enrich our lives, but we shouldn’t become a slave to it. It takes a conscious effort to do that and it’s in the best interest of us, humans to let it not rule our lives. And who better to begin this reversal than you. Take up the challenge and bring life back to you and those around you.

Image Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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A little self-restraint can save you some precious “Ahs” and “Ohs”!


                                           

One would think that one can be a free soul in certain scenarios; be yourself in the midst of your loved ones, primarily your family. Well, sure. But, every situation has its own rules and tenets. After all, we are humans. How did you ever think there would be a situation or scenario where all rules could just be blown away?

In any case, what we are discussing today is about self-restraint. Every person has a unique temperament. I know “spur of the moment; say it on your face” folks as well as “duh, were you talking to me?” folks. There are those that just absorb a situation and do not react to it at all versus those that absorb, analyze and then, come out with a self validated reaction based on their experience. And, then there are those that first react and then, go on to analyze what just happened.

There are several situations you tackle every day, be it at home, at work, in a social circle or even, in your virtual world, you know what I mean, social networks on the web, your e-mail etc. With the rapid exchanges these days and a horrendous influx of information to assimilate and analyze, it somehow seems that impromptu reactions are the best way to keep on top of such daunting interactions. As tempting as it might seem, it is in your best interest to exercise some self-restraint. If an interaction is important to you, take a moment, pause, think and store your reaction away to come back to later. That “later” might be a few minutes away, a few hours away or if possible, a few days away depending on the urgency of the matter at hand. When you come back to react at this later time, you will be amazed at your self and the vast difference in your reaction then, and now. Time is a great healer and brings about the balance in your reactions, the right balance that just probably saved you a job, a relationship, a life.

I am not saying that there should not be instant reactions at all. There are situations that definitely need these to save the day or cherish a moment, but judge those and react accordingly. But, if you feel hurried before reacting or feel that your urge has gotten the better of you, STOP! And follow the wait and react approach. You will never have to cry over spilt milk!