Nurturing High Impact Decision Making…


Decisions, decisions and more decisions……

Voluntarily or involuntarily, consciously or unconsciously, there are numerous decisions we make every day. Big and small, they all collectively design our lifestyle, our personal and professional relationships and pave way for our life to unfold.

The larger the decision, the more profound its impact, the more cautious we should become to think through, deliberate and finally arrive at a decision before its executed. And, the smaller decisions that do not have that much of impact, should come to us pretty naturally. 

Why do you think so?

Is it because, when impact does not have much of an influence in the larger scheme of things, we make them quickly? Or is it because we do not have to think through much when we frequently take smaller impact decisions or because, if they do go wrong, there’s not much at stake and it can be easily corrected?

Take a moment, and reflect on this.

Decisions whose impact will be felt long term, which can be far reaching for years to come and can determine the course of our own or several other lives; require in depth deliberation before they are made and it is a very unique skill, that is not much recognized. We generally tend to sweat the small stuff more. Decisions with smaller impact are what we end up wrapped in. However, there are also larger decisions with long-term impact that get made without as much deliberation on our end. That is because they are decisions that have been made, perhaps numerous times by others and each has its own impact on the decision maker’s life and yet, they are made time and over again without as much deliberation by others because they are happening all around us.

It’s also important to note that all decisions are not made with a clear view of all details influencing such decisions. Many a time, though we may strive, there is information missing that allows for a more robust decision. And yet, the decision needs to be made. The best approach to take is to review the best possible, worst possible and a mediocre result of a decision before deciding on it, knowing that it’s a decision being made in imperfect circumstances. This will allow us to review the far reaching effects of the decision and help make a choice, where we can see ourselves live with that decision falling somewhere in the band of best to worst we have created.

While decisions are made to maximize the value of what we are set out to do, over time the values may change or shift and review of such a decision may still hold its viability in this situation.

Every success, failure, opportunity availed or missed is the result of a decision made or missed.  Making decisions quickly, consistently and effectively is the cornerstone of making strides in the right direction.

Decisions, although seem to be making us resolute at the point in time they are taken, they are instrumental in shaping us into who we will be. However, is it the same as who we want to be? That’s where our cognitive skill of decision making comes into play and its uniquely you, who determines whether who you want to be and who you will be are on the same path.

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Rules of Engagement and Realm of Influence


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It’s the people, human resources that are the most important asset of any organization. It is these associates, employees, contractors and those engaged in various capacities that turn the wheels of the organization every single day in the direction of its aspirational mission. These associates come together in various roles, manning several myriad functions that together create the structure of the organization.

The roles and responsibilities of such associates, often times are overlapping and most definitely closely inter-twined to form the fabric of the organization. That is where rules of engagement and the sphere of influence come into play. Rules of engagement vary for every role within an organization and are based on their core responsibilities toward the organization. The job description lays a framework of expectations from a role & its associated responsibilities as well as expectations from the incumbent. However, rules of engagement are unique and evolve based on several factors. The role and its connectivity to other roles as well as the overarching organization are crucial. But what makes it unique, is the personalities occupying those roles. Every person is unique and is a sum total of their experiences at a given point in time. Their understanding of the role, responsibilities and inter-personal dynamics are unique as well. Their interpretation of this has an impact on their framework of rules of engagement. They engage and act based on all that they are influenced by.

In order to succeed at a role, it’s a given that one has to have clarity of vision of their role’s expectations and responsibilities, but more importantly, they need to develop a keen insight into the unique organizational dynamics at play and learn to shape their transactions accordingly, to the benefit of what they are set out to achieve as a part of their role with an eye on the big picture mission of the organization. This helps them maneuver well in reaching their professional as well as personal goals. Rules of engagement and the realm of a role’s influence, although have a rough framework; they are extended, expanded and emphatically executed by the unique personalities occupying these roles. The incumbent’s unique understanding and engagement with these rules, which, predominantly is influenced by their personalities, shape the fluidity and flexibility of a role’s influence. It is for this reason that several factors are looked at when recruiting people to occupy roles. It’s never just about the role that is vacant. It’s also about organizational fit. Beyond that, it’s the organic evolution of Darwinism within the organization, evolution by natural selection.

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