Nurturing High Impact Decision Making…


Decisions, decisions and more decisions……

Voluntarily or involuntarily, consciously or unconsciously, there are numerous decisions we make every day. Big and small, they all collectively design our lifestyle, our personal and professional relationships and pave way for our life to unfold.

The larger the decision, the more profound its impact, the more cautious we should become to think through, deliberate and finally arrive at a decision before its executed. And, the smaller decisions that do not have that much of impact, should come to us pretty naturally. 

Why do you think so?

Is it because, when impact does not have much of an influence in the larger scheme of things, we make them quickly? Or is it because we do not have to think through much when we frequently take smaller impact decisions or because, if they do go wrong, there’s not much at stake and it can be easily corrected?

Take a moment, and reflect on this.

Decisions whose impact will be felt long term, which can be far reaching for years to come and can determine the course of our own or several other lives; require in depth deliberation before they are made and it is a very unique skill, that is not much recognized. We generally tend to sweat the small stuff more. Decisions with smaller impact are what we end up wrapped in. However, there are also larger decisions with long-term impact that get made without as much deliberation on our end. That is because they are decisions that have been made, perhaps numerous times by others and each has its own impact on the decision maker’s life and yet, they are made time and over again without as much deliberation by others because they are happening all around us.

It’s also important to note that all decisions are not made with a clear view of all details influencing such decisions. Many a time, though we may strive, there is information missing that allows for a more robust decision. And yet, the decision needs to be made. The best approach to take is to review the best possible, worst possible and a mediocre result of a decision before deciding on it, knowing that it’s a decision being made in imperfect circumstances. This will allow us to review the far reaching effects of the decision and help make a choice, where we can see ourselves live with that decision falling somewhere in the band of best to worst we have created.

While decisions are made to maximize the value of what we are set out to do, over time the values may change or shift and review of such a decision may still hold its viability in this situation.

Every success, failure, opportunity availed or missed is the result of a decision made or missed.  Making decisions quickly, consistently and effectively is the cornerstone of making strides in the right direction.

Decisions, although seem to be making us resolute at the point in time they are taken, they are instrumental in shaping us into who we will be. However, is it the same as who we want to be? That’s where our cognitive skill of decision making comes into play and its uniquely you, who determines whether who you want to be and who you will be are on the same path.

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Do “nice” people make poor leaders?


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Definitely not! Well, let me start with that so you know where my sensibilities lie right at the beginning.

Niceness is a very valuable trait in any person, something that is becoming rare in today’s competitive environment.

“Nice” character traits most generally include agreeableness, trust, being a straight shooter, modesty and kindness. A person with niceness as a part of their personality generally tends to stay the same through life. Character traits are the blue print of a person and very rarely change unless the person experiences certain very hard life situations. As a result, the person develops a shield that they try to use to cover up their original personality fearing a recurrence of the bitterness that affected them.

It’s also a fact that more often that not, nice people are taken advantage of. But, that is where the use of personal charm comes into play so as to ensure that one is not abused. People in general are subtly biased towards niceness and feel that a nice person wouldn’t mind being pushed a little. Again, being nice is one thing, but you should also hold your stand and be firm. Niceness is not a weakness; it’s a virtue that is bolstered by being firm.

So, being nice is not always about putting others before you but is about putting yourself before others where it would benefit you as well as the others.

Leadership is about setting example, being a role model and leading the way towards mutual success. What better example to set than being nice yet being firm for a leader’s traits tend to permeate through the organization.

Any organization has

  • a responsibility towards its shareholders, employees and customers; its corporate responsibility;
  • a responsibility towards the community it thrives in and where its people resources live, its social responsibility and;
  • a responsibility towards the business it is in, towards the intellectual capital used; which in today’s time translates into intellectual responsibility.

It’s a leader’s duty, no matter at what level within the organization to safeguard and work towards the fulfillment of these responsibilities on an ongoing basis.

There are leaders that consider that corporate responsibility trumps it all. Again, there is bias towards the shareholders or the customers over employees and vice versa.

If employees feel neglected, their morale goes down and as a result, customers and shareholders suffer. If customers are neglected; no matter how much you may focus on the employees, the business as a whole suffers paving way for not being able to support those employees at all. If shareholders suffer, it has a ripple effect on the well being of the employees and customers.

Not one of them is exclusive. Hence, sound decisions have to be taken in consideration of the business as a whole. That is where the trait of niceness kicks in. A “nice” leader tends to see the big picture and contemplates about the morale and well being of the employees, the health of the business, the focus on shareholders as well as the top notch service that the customers deserve. The key is business health, not purely the financials or what the shareholders seek in terms of financial gain; which can at times happen at the expense of employees or customers. In such unharmonious situations, the rewards are short-lived.

Investing in the community where the organization lives and safeguarding and investing in the growth of intellectual capital are equally important to the long healthy life of a corporation.

As a business leader, it is important to have a sound mind and make sound decisions. There are 2 schools of thought; one that suggests the importance of empathy in business and the other, which states that business decisions are to be devoid of emotions.

I am of the opinion that a balanced approach to decision making is important. Too much or too less of anything can hurt. After all, a business is not just about money. It’s about the knowledge capital invested, the people and their skills that come into play to serve the customers that pay and expect the best possible service for their dollar. Each of these is vital and more important than that, the harmoniousness of their coming together to form the corporation and all that results from it is unique and truly admirable.

Someone who truly understands this and keeps it top of mind while imparting their duty makes the most ideal employee, the most ideal leader.